Feb. 12, 2017

A Smooth Sea

Mistakes.
We're going to make them.
We're human.
The finest performers and composers from history made a lot of mistakes on their individual roads to excellence.
There are no exceptions.
That's our human aspect and the most glorious part of learning (photo).
Error is a great teacher.
In making mistakes there is much instruction [See blog, Making Mistakes].
What's more, someone else's mistakes can teach us how to avoid making them ourselves.
That's the whole purpose of instruction ... to make things easier, to learn how to solve certain problems and make them easier to solve.
Growing to be a better problem solver and learning what works and what doesn't work is a big part of what this life is all about.
It's the whole purpose of education, the whole purpose of going to school, the whole purpose of this web site.
This world of ours is full of problems that beg to be solved.
But why is the world so full of problems? ... because the problems we face are not there to inhibit us, hold us back, or be an obstacle to our progress.
Problems are gateways to recognition; they're invitations to relationships; and they're the seeds for rewards.
Everything created solves some problem; your sunglasses solves a problem; your wrist watch solves a problem; your comb, your car or truck, your knife, fork, and spoon, your refrigerator, your stove, your cell phone, your winter coat ... all solve a problem.
Human beings are also created.
Which means that the solution to some problem an organization or worship center or even some person may have just might turn out to be you.
The next time you're faced with some problem on your way to making yourself into something better, it's good to remember that the effort you're expending trying to solve that same problem is good for you.
You may not get it solved completely, but count it all blessing.
Any mistake you make on your first attempt to solve it leads to discovering a better way to do it or the means to live with it if you can't.
The effort yields its own rewards.
We don't learn to walk by following rules and never taking a tumble.
We learn to walk by falling down and getting back up again.